Deleting the previous Windows 10 Install

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Windows 10 has been an adventure. I decided to “suffer for my art” and join the Windows 10 insider testing cycle. To add to my suffering I decided to join the fast cycle which meant more releases then normal.

If you are testing many things, you can run out of disk space and like most people there isn’t time to really go through and clean. What would be nice would be a fast recovery of space.

This is possible if you want to delete the previous install of Windows 10. On average, it was about 10 gig for me.

If you are happy with the current install and will not roll back to the previous release, you can delete the previous install.

Search for Settings and open it.

  • Click on System
  • Click Storage
  • Click “This PC (C:)
  • Scroll down and Click “Temporary Files

Here you will see your Temporary file usage and at the bottom of the list is “Previous version of Windows

Simple click “Delete previous versions” and start the process.

You can do other things while the cleanup runs.

As mentioned this is useful if you need space and don’t have time to do a proper cleanup. Don’t forget to look at your downloads.  People forget to check that all the time.  I had 27 gig  *coughs*

 

Win10 build 14251 breaks jabber

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

I am on the preview testing cycle for Windows 10. Why? I like to be tortured I guess. Originally, it was to get an early view of the OS through the Windows Insider Program.

At one point I installed the released version but the program overlaid my full OS with another build of the Preview releases. You have to cancel the program to prevent this.

I received build 14251 as part of the normal sequence but I found this release broke jabber. The text was invisible. Secret Agent Man Font? I verified many things were in place (an old one is active scripting disabled for IE). But nothing readily obvious.

A few days later 14257 was released and jabber worked again.

I don’t like Calibri

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

I use Microsoft Word for many things. After awhile; I start disliking the default font of Calibri.  It’s a usable readable font. I just don’t like it.

It’s annoying to select a new font each time I start a new file. Why not change it so I don’t have to do that? I know “Duh!”

The new Office (I am using 2013) at times seems to be designed to hide things. Probably because of the average user being….well I won’t get into name calling as I “may” have done a few “bonehead” things in my time.

The way to change the default is through the basic templates. My two main templates are Normal and Nospace (created to avoid the the default 2 lines for CR).

The steps are simple:

  1. Start a new blank document
  2. Under the Styles box (Home tab); right-click Normal (or in my case Nospace) and select Modify.
  3. Click the Formatting drop down and select the Font you like( If you are curious, I like Times New Roman).
  4. You can also adjust the size.
  5. Near the bottom look for New documents based on this template. If it’s not selected, click the dot.
  6. Click OK.

This will set your next documents font to what you like by default.

As with anything if you steal borrow from others, always give them their acknowledgement.

Happy New Year everyone!

Friday, January 1st, 2016

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 10,000 times in 2015. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Command line to start task scheduler?

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

I was cleaning task scheduler jobs and found a 2012 server which would not display the task scheduler or scheduled tasks. As I was on a time table and could not review this system; I needed the command line.

To start the GUI for the task scheduler; simple enter:

taskschd.msc

BSOD goes away before I can read it

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

A windows virtual machine goes bad and gives the terrible Blue Screen of Death. The problem is it goes away before you can read it.

What is interesting is the way many people can overlook a simple solution for getting this information. There are many articles about what to do to slow down the boot process, capturing error messages through many steps, etc., etc.

If it was a physical host, it makes sense.  However, with a virtual machine and using the host console (in this case VMware); there is a simple way.

Watch the system go through the reboot and attempt to load. When the BSOD appears, take a screen capture.

 

Remote logins are currently disabled.

Sunday, November 15th, 2015

Our monitoring systems reported errors with a terminal server. I tried remote desktop and received the following error:

Remote logins are currently disabled.

Someone with administrator access disabled the logins with the change logon command.

The management console for reasons not pertinent to this issue was not usable at this time. In order to enable the logins, I needed to a way to submit the command.

Time for our trusty friend “psexec”

psexec.exe “\\<terminal server>\ change logon /enable”

After that we could access the terminal server.

Can’t restore backup to iPhone 6s

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

It was time for a new company phone. I ran a backup like a good person. Traded in my phone and received the new iPhone.

I went to restore the backup and kept getting password invalid messages.  I was entering the correct password for the iTunes account so what was wrong?

It turns out that iTunes has it’s own password. Luckily, I remembered the old password and was able to run the restore.

Anti-virus firewall is blocking remote desktop.

Friday, October 30th, 2015

Company acquisitions bring new challenges to environments. Such was the case with two servers which are used to test McAfee with the companies product. These servers were moved from a public area to a hardened site. They used to walk up and login when needed but now they could only use remote desktop. They reported the servers were down.

The McAfee fire was setup with a basic configuration and blocked ICMP and but did not block remote desktop.

Ping was enabled and on further review port 3389 needed to be enabled for TCP.