Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

Adblock Plus now sells ads?

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

This used to be an add blocker but they have been positioning themselves as an advertiser preaching the nonsense of acceptable ads. It’s an old approach.  Present a new “service” and then start doing what was done before but you have people paying for it.  When cable TV first appeared, the big selling point was “ad free.” Once the base was established; it changed we are going to introduce ads so we don’t have to charge more. Now we pay for the privileged of getting ads.

Adblock at the moment doesn’t charge but in time there will be paid levels to “reduce” ads or better control them.

I am dumping them.

Look into uBlock origin. They have a link for an iOS 9 product and I know they have addons for Chrome and Firefox.

Souce.

 

Use a KMS outside of the domain

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

I had an issue where we needed a small domain to register it’s Windows 2012 virtual machines to the main KMS of the company.

The problem was the small domain had it’s own IP range and it’s own DNS. I attempted to activate the virtual machines and received a message reporting the KMS was not resolvable in DNS.

Since this was a tiny domain and the DNS would not be managed, I needed another way to activate the virtual machines.

Looking at the options of the slmgr script, I found what I needed.

slmgr.vbs /skms <ip address>:<port number>

This tells the system where to look for the KMS and what port to use.

After the “OK” message, I simply attempted activation via:

slmgr.vbs /ato

The virtual machines activated.

 

 

The Group Policy Client service failed the logon. Access denied

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

I had a user complaint over not being able to access a terminal server. He would attempt access and receive an error message:

The Group Policy Client service failed the logon. Access denied.

Since it was a terminal server; I renamed his profile and he was able to access it.

Deleting the previous Windows 10 Install

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Windows 10 has been an adventure. I decided to “suffer for my art” and join the Windows 10 insider testing cycle. To add to my suffering I decided to join the fast cycle which meant more releases then normal.

If you are testing many things, you can run out of disk space and like most people there isn’t time to really go through and clean. What would be nice would be a fast recovery of space.

This is possible if you want to delete the previous install of Windows 10. On average, it was about 10 gig for me.

If you are happy with the current install and will not roll back to the previous release, you can delete the previous install.

Search for Settings and open it.

  • Click on System
  • Click Storage
  • Click “This PC (C:)
  • Scroll down and Click “Temporary Files

Here you will see your Temporary file usage and at the bottom of the list is “Previous version of Windows

Simple click “Delete previous versions” and start the process.

You can do other things while the cleanup runs.

As mentioned this is useful if you need space and don’t have time to do a proper cleanup. Don’t forget to look at your downloads.  People forget to check that all the time.  I had 27 gig  *coughs*

 

Command line to start task scheduler?

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

I was cleaning task scheduler jobs and found a 2012 server which would not display the task scheduler or scheduled tasks. As I was on a time table and could not review this system; I needed the command line.

To start the GUI for the task scheduler; simple enter:

taskschd.msc

BSOD goes away before I can read it

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

A windows virtual machine goes bad and gives the terrible Blue Screen of Death. The problem is it goes away before you can read it.

What is interesting is the way many people can overlook a simple solution for getting this information. There are many articles about what to do to slow down the boot process, capturing error messages through many steps, etc., etc.

If it was a physical host, it makes sense.  However, with a virtual machine and using the host console (in this case VMware); there is a simple way.

Watch the system go through the reboot and attempt to load. When the BSOD appears, take a screen capture.

 

Remote logins are currently disabled.

Sunday, November 15th, 2015

Our monitoring systems reported errors with a terminal server. I tried remote desktop and received the following error:

Remote logins are currently disabled.

Someone with administrator access disabled the logins with the change logon command.

The management console for reasons not pertinent to this issue was not usable at this time. In order to enable the logins, I needed to a way to submit the command.

Time for our trusty friend “psexec”

psexec.exe “\\<terminal server>\ change logon /enable”

After that we could access the terminal server.

Anti-virus firewall is blocking remote desktop.

Friday, October 30th, 2015

Company acquisitions bring new challenges to environments. Such was the case with two servers which are used to test McAfee with the companies product. These servers were moved from a public area to a hardened site. They used to walk up and login when needed but now they could only use remote desktop. They reported the servers were down.

The McAfee fire was setup with a basic configuration and blocked ICMP and but did not block remote desktop.

Ping was enabled and on further review port 3389 needed to be enabled for TCP.

What type of windows licesense do I have?

Saturday, September 5th, 2015

Any reasonable sized Windows development shop will find itself using both Volume Licensed and MSDN software. Due to the nature of the MSDN licensing; sometimes you have to verify the licenses. The question asked is “How do you tell the difference?”

In my particular instance, a simple command will give you information to make the distinction.

slmgr /dli

(use CTRL + C to copy output from the resulting window)

---------------------------
Windows Script Host
---------------------------
Name: Windows(R), Enterprise edition
Description: Windows(R) Operating System, VOLUME_KMS_W10 channel
Partial Product Key: *snip*
License Status: Licensed
*snip*

If you notice where it displayed “channel” you will see the word “VOLUME”

This particular install uses a volume license.

The following was taken from a test server:

---------------------------
Windows Script Host
---------------------------
Name: Windows Server(R), ServerStandard edition
Description: Windows Operating System - Windows Server(R), VOLUME_KMSCLIENT channel
Partial Product Key: *snip*
License Status: Licensed
Volume activation expiration: 249240 minute(s) (173 day(s))

Key Management Service client information
 Client Machine ID (CMID): *snip*
 KMS machine name from DNS: *snip*
 KMS machine extended PID: *snip*
 Activation interval: 120 minutes
 Renewal interval: 10080 minutes
 KMS host caching is enabled

Another volume license.

In time I will update this with output from an OEM, Retail, and MSDN.

Flagging duplicates in excel

Monday, July 20th, 2015

Excel is a useful tool in matters such as listing systems which need migration to new domains. Problem is duplication of records.  Rather then sorting and reviewing each entry; why not flag each duplicate found?

  • To do so:
    1. Select the range of cells you wish to test. …
    2. On Excel’s Home tab, choose Conditional Formatting, Highlight Cells Rules, and then Duplicate Values.
    3. Click OK within the Duplicate Values dialog box to identify the duplicate values.
    4. Duplicate values in the list will now be identified.
  • Identifying Duplicate Values in an Excel List | AccountingWEB

    m.accountingweb.com/article/identifying-duplicate-values-excel…/221103